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October 2016 Newsletter Article

As I have grown older, I have come to appreciate more and more the miracle that is our eyes. Our eyes have 130 million light sensitive rods and cones that perceive the beauty of God’s creation reflected in the light. Our eyes also have the ability to automatically elongate or compress themselves, bringing the one thing we are looking at — whether up close or far away — into clear focus. But what is just as amazing is what our eyes are not suited to do. Our eyes are made to see in the light and not in the darkness. Have you ever thought about what it would be like to see with the eyes of a cat, making you completely at home in the darkness? Our eyes are made with relatively poor peripheral vision. We see clearly what is before us, but we do not easily perceive what is not directly before us. Have you ever thought about what it would be like to see with the eyes of a deer, perceiving all around you but not focusing on what is right in front of your face? Even more amazing that this is the fact that our eyes are made to see in only one facet, looking at something from only one perspective at a time. Have you ever thought about what it would be like to see with the eyes of a fly, looking at something in its many facets; from many perspectives at once? But no, God made our eyes the way He wants us to see. He made our eyes to see beauty in the light. He made our eyes to focus on one thing and see it clearly. He made our eyes to see things in one facet rather than many. And as I think about the miracle of our eyes, I have to ask myself a question. If God made us to see a certain way, would He not reveal Himself to us that way? If God made our eyes to see in the light; to see particularly and clearly; and to see in one facet, then it stands to reason that this is also how He wishes us to see Him.

This is the message we have heard from Him and declare to you: God is light; in Him there is no darkness as all” (1 John 1:5, NIV). God made our eyes to see in the light, and God has revealed Himself to us as the light of the world. Think about that for a moment. Jesus said, “I am the light of the world. Whoever follows me will never walk in darkness, but will have the light of life” (John 8:12, NIV). God made us to see in the light; He made us to walk in that light; and He revealed Himself as that light. So why is it that, throughout the history of the Church, we have spent so much time and effort looking for God in the dark recesses of our mind? Why have we spent so much time staring into the darkness in an effort to see what God is not in order to determine for ourselves what God is, when all the time He has revealed Himself to us not only in the light that He created us to see, but AS that very light?

Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your strength” (Deut. 6:4-5, NIV). God made our eyes to focus on one thing at a time, and God has revealed Himself as one. This oneness of God is more than a simple monotheistic statement in the face of the pluralistic world, it is a statement of how God has revealed Himself to us; how He wants us to perceive and understand Him. So why is it that, throughout the history of the Church, we have spent so much time trying to pick God apart like a frog being dissected in biology class? Why do we try so hard to exhaustively understand the various attributes of God in order to determine for ourselves what God is, when all the time He has revealed Himself to us in the way He made us to see? When I look at a friend; a loved one; a neighbor, I don’t see or try to focus on his attributes — examining each under a microscope. When I look at a friend; a loved one; a neighbor, I see that one person, in his oneness as a friend; a loved one; a neighbor. God made us to see one thing and God has revealed Himself to us as one, so that we can love Him wholly, with all our heart and with all our soul and with all our strength.

All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit” (Matthew 28:18-20, NIV). One of the greatest mysteries of God is His Trinitarian nature. We know that the Godhead is Trinity because God has been revealed in His Word as Trinity and God has been proclaimed as Trinity by God the Son Himself. But as much as we might know THAT God is Trinity, we are incapable of perceiving Him as Trinity. God did not make us to see in facets but to see singularly. And as God has made us to see singularly, God has revealed Himself to us singularly through the Son. In His incarnation, God in His Trinity did not become incarnate. Neither the Father nor the Holy Spirit became incarnate, but only the Son was revealed to us in the flesh. So why is it that, throughout the history of the Church, so much time has been spent trying to see and understand God in the fullness of His Trinity? Why do try so hard to see God as He is in order to determine for ourselves what God is, when all the time He has revealed Himself to us in the way He made us to see? We were not made to see in many facets, but one facet only and God has revealed the very fullness of Himself to us through one facet; through God the Son.

God made us to see Him and He revealed Himself to us in the very way He made us to see. This does not mean that we should ignore the Deus Absconditus (the hidden God), but it does mean that we should seek to know God’s hidden glory through the Deus Revelatus (God as He has revealed Himself). We can only truly see God as He has revealed Himself to us through God the Son’s incarnation, suffering and death. We see God clearly when we see Him on the cross. This does not mean that we should turn a blind eye to God’s attributes in order to see Him in His oneness, but it does mean that we should first see Him in the one person revealed to us, God the Son made flesh in Jesus Christ. As we seek to understand God’s omniscience, omnipotence, and omnipresence, we should understand those attributes through the person of Jesus Christ who set aside that omniscience, omnipotence, and omnipresence and took on all the limitations flesh, so that He might experience humiliation, suffering, and death for our sake. We see God clearly when we see Him on the cross. This does not mean that we should ignore God’s Trinitarian nature, but it does mean that we should seek to understand the Trinitarian facets of the Godhead only through and in relation to the one facet revealed to us, God the Son. Our only legitimate access to any understanding of the Trinity is in relation to God the Son and as He has proclaimed the Father and the Spirit to us. We can only see clearly in the way we were made to see and we can only thank God that He has revealed Himself to us in the way He made us to see Him.

But blessed are your eyes because they see” (Matthew 13:16, NIV).

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